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[salt tank information] [fishes] [building new tank] [disease recognition]

                                                                     [invertebrates] [starfish, snails] [crabs] [anemone]

 

                  Some common stars that usually we can find in "salt hobby".


Sifting Tiger Star Fish (Astropecten polycanthus). The Sand Sifting Sea Star or Starfish is the best starfish we have found for keeping your sand clean. It has a thick, beige to brown body. Very active, very effective at moving large amounts of sand as it searches for food. They are omnivores and are great for reef aquariums for eating detritus and left over food. It does well in an aquarium setting if provided with a fairly thick sand bottom where it can feed and hide. The Sand Star is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling.
Orange Linkia Star (Echunaster sp). These bright orange (sunglasses required), Linkia's will surely brighten up your tank with their eye catching glow of color. Maintain stable pH and specific gravity levels to keep this starfish healthy. Sudden changes in water parameters can cause bacterial infections that may cause necrosis of its arms, or even death. Although it is a scavenger you may supplement its diet by placing scraps of meaty foods near it, or under it. The Linkia species is generally peaceful toward other tank mates. They need places to hide. The Blue Linckia is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling.
Red Linkia Star (Linckia laevigata). The Red Linkia will spend much of its time foraging the reef for tiny micro-organisms and detritus to eat. Maintain stable pH and specific gravity levels to keep this starfish healthy. Sudden changes in water parameters can cause bacterial infections that may cause necrosis of its arms, or even death. Although it is a scavenger you may supplement its diet by placing scraps of meaty foods near it, or under it. The Linkia species is generally peaceful toward other tank mates. They need places to hide. The Red Linckia is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling.
Purple Linckia Star
(Linckia laevigata).  Purple Linkia's will surely brighten up your tank with their eye catching color. Maintain stable pH and specific gravity levels to keep this starfish healthy. Sudden changes in water parameters can cause bacterial infections that may cause necrosis of its arms, or even death. Although it is a scavenger you may supplement its diet by placing scraps of meaty foods near it, or under it. The Linkia species is generally peaceful toward other tank mates. They need places to hide. The Purple Linckia Star is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling.
Fromia Sea Star
(Fromia Monilis). The Fromia is also called the Marble Sea Star, or Marble Starfish. Their patterns and colors make them one of the most striking . Coloration of the Assorted Marble Sea Stars range from a deep red to orange, and both the central disc and the arms are mottled in a lighter coloration to cream, giving them a marbled look. Found over sandy substrates, on rocks, and sometimes climbing among corals and other invertebrates, they are constantly foraging for micro-organisms and detritus to eat, so the aquarium should have ample amounts of live rock. Fromia's generally lives alone, but if the aquarium is large enough to support more than one, it will tolerate others of its own species. The Marble Sea Star is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling.
Red Bali Star (Fromia milleporella). The Bali Red Star is a miniature star fish which stays small never exceeding about 3 inches. Found over sandy substrates, on rocks, and sometimes climbing among corals and other invertebrates, they are constantly foraging for micro-organisms and detritus to eat, so the aquarium should have ample amounts of live rock. Red Bali Sea Star is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling. 
Burgundy Sea Star (Tamaria sp). The Burgundy Sea Star, is a burgundy to magenta color, and sometimes has six instead of five arms. It prefers a well-lit aquarium with a sandy, coral rubble substrate, and live rock. It will move over the rock searching for small micro- organisms and other bits of common detritus to eat. Generally solitary, the Burgundy Sea Star is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature , oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling. 
African Red Knob Star (Protoreaster linckii). The African Red Knob Sea Star, has a thick, gray body with multiple bright red tubercles extending upward along each of its five arms. It is found in the Indian Ocean. The African Red Knob Sea Star requires a large aquarium with ample supplies of live rock. Not reef compatible, the Red Knob will eat soft corals, sponges, tubeworms, clams, starfish, and other invertebrates. Like all star fish, the Red Knob is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling.

Bahamas Star (Oreaster Reticulatis). The Bahamas Sea Star, has a thick, Red and orange body. It is found in the Caribbean. Not reef compatible, the Bahamas Star will eat soft corals, sponges, tubeworms, clams, starfish, and other invertebrates. Like all star fish, the Bahamas is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling. 
 
Chocolate Chip Star (Protoreastor nodosus) Very popular for fish-only aquariums. They are brown, tan, orange, or black in color with black spots which resemble chocolate chips. Very hardy. Chocolate Chip Stars will spend the day cruising along rock and aquarium glass. Not reef compatible, the Chocolate Chip Star will eat soft corals, sponges, tubeworms, clams, starfish, and other invertebrates. Like all star fish, the Chocolate Chip is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling.
Assorted Common Stars. Assorted common stars are collected from the Caribbean. Not reef compatible, the Chocolate Chip Star will eat soft corals, sponges, tubeworms, clams, starfish, and other invertebrates. Like all star fish, they are very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling. 
Basket Star (Astrophyton muricatum) Colors vary greatly on these beauties of the sea. They hide within recesses of the reef by day, but emerge at night and spread out their baskets, like arms to filter plankton from the water. Like all star fish, it is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications.  
Feather Starfish (Lamprometra palmata). The Feather Starfish is an unusual species that looks more like a plant than a starfish. It ranges in color from brown to orange, yellow, and black. Like the Basket Star, the Feather Starfish is a filter feeder. It is nocturnal, and at night it can be found with its long arms unfurled where it filters plankton from the water.  Expect some diversity since each animal is unique in color and pattern. Like all star fish, the Red Knob is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling. 
Colored Serpent Stars. Serpent Stars come in a variety of colors. All have a central, disc and 5 arms. If an arm falls off it quickly regenerates. The central disc and arms can have variable markings. It does well in an aquarium if provided with ample hiding places and plenty of room to roam. Even though it is a nocturnal animal, it may eventually learn to come out during the day to eat. Like all star fish, they are very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. It should never be exposed to air while handling. 
Tiger Striped Serpent Stars. The Tiger Striped Serpent Star has bands of color on their legs. The central disk may also be mottled with color.
Fancy Yellow Brittle Star (Ophiothrix sp). From the island of Fiji, a Super Hardy efficient scavenger and sand sifter, the Yellow Fancy Brittle Sea Star of the Ophiothrix genus has a very small olive green central disc which may have variable patterns. The long spiny, yellow arms are fringed with white or black spines. It is nocturnal and often hides under rocks during the day. At night, it comes out to eat detritus and small organisms. Like all star fish, it is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications.
Red Brittle Star (Ophiothrix sp). S.O.S. Brittle stars are one of the best detritus removers. (detritus causes high nitrates). From Australia, the Red Brittle is a Super Hardy efficient scavenger and sand sifter, the Yellow Fancy Brittle Sea Star of the Ophiothrix genus has a very small olive green central disc which may have variable patterns. The long spiny, yellow arms are fringed with white or black spines. It is nocturnal and often hides under rocks during the day. At night, it comes out to eat detritus and small organisms. Like all star fish, it is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications.
Green Brittle Star (Ophiarachna Incrassata). From the island of Fiji, a Super Hardy efficient scavenger and sand sifter, the Yellow Fancy Brittle Sea Star of the Ophiothrix genus has a very small olive green central disc which may have variable patterns. The long spiny, yellow arms are fringed with white or black spines. It is nocturnal and often hides under rocks during the day. At night, it comes out to eat detritus and small organisms. Like all star fish, it is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications.  
Bubble Tip Brittle Star (Ophiothrix sp). From the island of Fiji, a Super Hardy efficient scavenger and sand sifter, the Yellow Fancy Brittle Sea Star of the Ophiothrix genus has a very small olive green central disc which may have variable patterns. The long spiny, yellow arms are fringed with white or black spines. It is nocturnal and often hides under rocks during the day. At night, it comes out to eat detritus and small organisms. Like all star fish, it is very intolerant of sudden changes in temperature, oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications.  
Blue Linkia Star Fish (Linckia laevigata). This brilliant blue starfish will spend much of its time foraging the reef for tiny micro-organisms and detritus to eat. Maintain stable pH and specific gravity levels to keep this starfish healthy. Sudden changes in water parameters can cause bacterial infections that may cause necrosis of its arms, or even death. Although it is a scavenger you may supplement its diet by placing scraps of meaty foods near it, or under it. The Linkia species is generally peaceful toward other tank mates. They need places to hide. Be careful with copper-based medication.

Queen Conch. The Queen Conch are hardy algae eaters (yes even Cyanobacteria slime algae)! They also love the brown diatoms found on aquarium glass and on the surface of live sand beds. They will stir and clean upper layers of the sand bed. One of the best reef tank cleaners. As they burrow and dig through the aquarium substrate they clean and aerate the bottom. Completely reef safe, they will not harm corals or eat coralline algae. They grow to about 3" and do well in all sizes of reef aquaria. The Queen Conch is an omnivore , supply pieces of fresh fish and dried seaweed, as well as high quality frozen foods, to supplement what they will feed on from the bottom of the tank.
Green Abalone.
Abalone's eat tons of algae including hair algae!!! Abalone cruise along your aquarium eating diatoms, and other film algae. It is also a sand sifter and one of the few mollusks that will take care of hair algae problems. The shell of the Abalone is tear-shaped and has an iridescent interior color. They are generally nocturnal, finding refuge in the rocks or coral during the day, and coming out to forage at night. Useful in reef aquariums because they eat tons of algae, the Abalone has proven to be a sturdy aquarium specimens with broad chemical and physical condition tolerance ( still be careful with copper-based medication and extreme nitrate levels). For in between algae feedings, they accept prepared foods readily. Usually peaceful toward other tank mates and of course reef-safe.  
Astrea Snails. The Astrea loves to graze on algae. A very active cleaner, it cleans algae and diatoms. If it falls, it is often unable to right itself, and will need the aquarist to place it upright, again.  One of the best snails for controlling Diatom 's, (light brown/red algae), Green Algae Blooms and Dark Purple/Red Slime algae . Introduced as soon as possible to new aquarium, these snails effectively limit the development of all micro algae. Recommend 1 per 2 gallons. 
Cerith Snails. One of the most ideal scavengers, detritus eaters, and algae eaters these snails are perfect for the reef aquarium, quickly devouring detritus, uneaten food, decaying organics, fish waste, and several types of nuisance algae. This is one of the best snails we have tested for Diatom algae. Cerith Snails will often bury themselves in the sand, which will help maintain adequate oxygen levels in the substrate. One inch long pointed shell, it is small enough to get hard to reach spots between the rocks.  It's able to remove diatoms so well that they do not re-grow from the original algae film. They will not dislodge or disturb any specimens and is an active glass cleaner . 
Zebra Striped Turbo Snails. The Zebra Stripe Turbo Snail, comes from Belize and is a great variation from the typical Mexican Turbo Snail. These outstanding cleaners will scour rock and glass in search of its next meal. The Zebra Turbo are about 2 to 3 times larger and do about 5 times as much work as the Atlantic Turbo Astrea Snail. They are pure workhorses. Eager to eat several types of micro algae commonly found in the home aquarium. When pulled across a surface, this rasp pulls the algae loose for a quick snack. When algae is in low supply, green seaweed sheets can be supplemented to help ensure balanced nutrition. Recommend 1 per 5 gallon.  
Mexican Turbo Snails. Mexican Turbo Grazer's clean more algae than any other snail. Mexican Turbo's, are collected from the Pacific waters along the coast of Mexico near the Sea of Cortez. These snails are referred to as grazers because of their voracious appetites for several types of micro algae found in the home aquarium. The Mexican Snails are about 2 to 3 times larger and do about 5 times as much work as the Atlantic Turbo Astrea Snail. They are pure work horses. Eager to eat several types of micro algae commonly found in the home aquarium.  When pulled across a surface, this rasp pulls the algae loose for a quick snack. When algae is in low supply, green seaweed sheets can be supplemented to help ensure balanced nutrition. Recommend 1 per 5 gallons. 
Trochus Snails. They move very slowly but leave nothing behind, eating filamentous algae, slime algae, green algae, diatoms, and Cyanobacteria. Add to this the fact that they often are able to right themselves if they fall on their backs. Pyramid shaped similar to an Astrea snail, they get about the size of a quarter when full grown, and are a perfect aquarium snail since they come from warmer waters. Extremely hardy, as long as water quality remains good they have a very long life. Many live from 5 to 7 years. No tank should be without some of these. Recommend 1 per 5 gallons. 
Nerite Snails. Nerite snails are good herbivores to include in the reef tank, very popular item among our repeat customers and once they get used to the aquarium environment will consume large amounts of algae especially around the top edge of the glass. They remain fairly small and do not disturb the landscaping. Nerite Snails are smallish, less than an inch long, with a very rounded shell. Very hardy and long lived. Does well within normal reef tank temperature ranges of 25C-26C.
Bumble Bee Snails. Totally Reef Safe, they are about 3/8" and look like Bumble Bee's. A great scavenger, cleaning up both your sand bed, rocks, and glass. They take care of diatoms, and red slime too.
Assarius Snails. One of the best snails for cleaning your tank!!! Excellent reef inhabitants, they sift sand, eat algae and detritus, and are great scavengers. If turned over on there back, these snails can flip themselves upright. Guaranteed not to knock over or harm corals. 

email me : akop_arakelian@hotmail.com

 

Hakob Arakelian
Copyright 2005 [Hakob Arakelian].